Society in Business and Cultural Norms

Dr. Rev. Jenine Marie Howry, Ph.D. Life Empowerment Coach, Hypnotherapist, Guided Mediation

The word society can have a broad meaning. When I hear that word, I think of humanity itself. Yet, there are societies within society that make up our everyday life. Within our societies, we create a culture. Let us take the family, for instance. Our family life and the family circle have a particular culture about it. The family has beliefs, what is considered normal, and specific characteristics that make it a family.

Within business, there is also a culture. Most people are in their area of work more than they are with their families. When a person walks into a specific culture, they tend to pick up on the beliefs, ideals, norms, and workplace standards. The standards in a professional office building are often not the same as the standards on a construction site. Still, each creates a culture and a mini-society.

Each person who participates within a business or workplace culture will eventually become like the culture within it. Either this will occur, or the person will leave because they do not feel they fit into the culture’s norms. If someone walks into the business culture and objects to the standards, they might try to change it, depending on the power given to them to do so. This might not come as easily as one might think. Try walking into a construction site and changing their manner of speaking, values, work ethics, etc. This statement is not meant to judge construction sites, but let’s face it, people who work there let their verbal hair down much more liberally than, for instance, a law office.

A person cannot just discipline one employee when all of the employees behave the same. If a culture is to be changed, the work to be done is so broad. (Not to mention censoring someone’s speech these days is getting crazy and far beyond taking away a person’s right to free speech.) Yet, we behave a certain way the culture teaches us to act, right down to how we speak to one another.

I guess the main thing to think about is production. Are the people getting along and producing toward making a profit? People should get along with the manner of speech they are used to in order to produce. Conflict is a bigger problem than freedom of speech rights. When conflict arises, production falls as morale falls. The more excellent management skill is to make sure the wheels of production are turning much more than trying to decide if they like a person’s behavior or not. It does not matter who does not seem to fit into a culture. What matters in business is production. If this is accomplished, why rock the boat? Let people be people and allow the society to maintain the culture they are familiar with.

Loving you from here,

Dr. Rev. Jenine Marie Howry, Ph.D.

Come and book a session with me at JenineMarie.com